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Home Dialysis Services


Home Hemodialysis


Home Dialysis provides patients with a treatment plan that they can self-administer in their homes, achieving an independent and active lifestyle. The program is designed for patients who would like more independence and control over their treatment.


Patients and their families, or care partners learn how to perform dialysis using equipment provided by the hospital, and supplies which are delivered to the patients’ homes each month free of charge. Training sessions are arranged based on the patient’s individual learning needs and usually occurs over several weeks. We have a specially designed home-training area, and use a range of educational materials and learning tools. We have home dialysis nurses and technologists available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Patients visit the clinic for evaluation every two or three months, or as recommended by their nephrologist.


The Nephrology team can assist patients, if needed, to decide which of the following three home hemodialysis options best fits their lifestyle:

  • Conventional Home Hemodialysis – 4 hour treatments are scheduled three to four times per week. This option allows patients the flexibility to do their dialysis treatments at home during the day or evening rather than travel to the dialysis centre.

  • Short Daily Home Hemodialysis – 2-3 hour treatments are scheduled five to seven times per week. Many reports indicate that people performing short daily home hemodialysis may:
    • take less medication to control blood pressure and anemia
    • take less medication to keep phosphorus under control to help prevent bone disease
    • have improvements in neuropathy (nerve damage) and less restless leg syndrome
    • feel better during dialysis and less “washed out” after dialysis
    • have more energy for daily tasks
    • sleep better
    • have fewer and shorter hospital stays
    • have better quality of life
    • live longer

  • Nocturnal Home Hemodialysis - involves long, slow treatments done at night over six to eight hours while the patient sleeps, leaving their days free to pursue other activities such as work or school. Treatments can be every other night or up to seven nights a week depending on what the doctor prescribes. This is the best alternative to kidney transplantation. Many reports indicate that people using nocturnal home hemodialysis may:
    • take less or no medication to control blood pressure and anemia
    • take less or no medication to keep phosphorus under control to help prevent bone disease
    • have improvements in neuropathy (nerve damage) and less restless leg syndrome
    • feel better during dialysis and less “washed out” after
    • have more energy for daily tasks
    • be on an unrestricted diet
    • sleep better
    • have fewer and shorter hospital stays
    • have better quality of life
    • live longer
    • experience more and smoother dialysis treatments than any other type of dialysis

Referral by a physician or another nephrology/dialysis program is required.
200 Church St., Toronto, Ontario M9N 1N8
8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Monday to Friday
Hemodialysis education/training sessions are scheduled during the day on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, as prescribed by the Nephrologist.
416-658-2264
Fax - 416-658-2265


Home Peritoneal Dialysis


Patients can perform peritoneal dialysis treatments at home, at work or while traveling. This is the easiest method of home dialysis, and most patients and families can learn it in less than one week. They may be able to use fewer medications and eat a less restrictive diet than with hemodialysis.


Patients using Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis (CAPD) learn how to exchange special dialysis fluid through a small, permanent tube in their abdomen at regular intervals throughout the day. These exchanges are usually done four times a day. This type of dialysis tends to be more portable, allowing patients more flexibility to travel (with their dialysis supplies).


Continuous cycling peritoneal dialysis (CCPD) or Automated Peritoneal Dialysis (APD) is administered through a permanent tube in the abdomen using a machine (cycler) programmed to automatically exchange the dialysis fluid. This is usually done overnight while the patient sleeps. Travel is also possible with CCPD.


Patients who are unable to independently perform treatments or have limited support at home are referred to Community Care Access Centres (CCAC) for dialysis care.


Peritoneal dialysis may be the better option if:

  • The patient can't tolerate the rapid changes of fluid balance associated with conventional hemodialysis.
  • The patient wants to minimize the disruption of their daily activities and work or wishes to travel more easily.

Peritoneal dialysis might not work if the patient has:

  • extensive surgical scars in their abdomen
  • a large abdominal hernia
  • a limited ability to care for themselves or lack caregiving support at home
  • inflammatory bowel disease or frequent bouts of infections

Referral by a physician or from another nephrology/dialysis program is required.
200 Church St., Toronto, Ontario M9N 1N8
8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Monday to Friday
Peritoneal dialysis education/training sessions are scheduled during the day, three to five days a week between Monday and Friday as prescribed by the Nephrologist.
416-658-2264
Fax - 416-658-2265

 

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